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Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

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Anhang.
his stock of provisions, it is lawful, though an extreme measure, to
drive them back, so as to hasten on the surrender.

19.

Commanders, whenever admissible, inform the enemy of their
intention to bombard a place, so that the non-combatants, and espe-
cially the women and children, may be removed before the bom-
bardment commences. But it is no infraction of the common law
of war to omit thus to inform the enemy. Surprise may be a
necessity.

20.

Public war is a state of armed hostility between sovereign
nations or governments. It is a law and requisite of civilized exi-
stence that men live in political, continuous societies, forming orga-
nized units, called states or nations, whose constituents bear, enjoy,
and suffer, advance and retrograde together, in peace and in war.

21.

The citizen or native of a hostile country is thus an enemy,
as one of the constituents of the hostile state or nation, and as
such is subjected to the hardships of the war.

22.

Nevertheless, as civilization has advanced during the last cen-
turies, so has likewise steadily advanced, especially in war on land,
the distinction between the private individual belonging to a hostile
country and the hostile country itself, with its men in arms. The
principle bas been more and more acknowledged that the unarmed
citizen is to be spared in person, property, and honor as much as
the exigencies of war will admit.

23.

Private citizens are no longer murdered, enslaved, or carried
off to distant parts, and the inoffensive individual is as little disturbed

Anhang.
his stock of provisions, it is lawful, though an extreme measure, to
drive them back, so as to hasten on the surrender.

19.

Commanders, whenever admissible, inform the enemy of their
intention to bombard a place, so that the non-combatants, and espe-
cially the women and children, may be removed before the bom-
bardment commences. But it is no infraction of the common law
of war to omit thus to inform the enemy. Surprise may be a
necessity.

20.

Public war is a state of armed hostility between sovereign
nations or governments. It is a law and requisite of civilized exi-
stence that men live in political, continuous societies, forming orga-
nized units, called states or nations, whose constituents bear, enjoy,
and suffer, advance and retrograde together, in peace and in war.

21.

The citizen or native of a hostile country is thus an enemy,
as one of the constituents of the hostile state or nation, and as
such is subjected to the hardships of the war.

22.

Nevertheless, as civilization has advanced during the last cen-
turies, so has likewise steadily advanced, especially in war on land,
the distinction between the private individual belonging to a hostile
country and the hostile country itself, with its men in arms. The
principle bas been more and more acknowledged that the unarmed
citizen is to be spared in person, property, and honor as much as
the exigencies of war will admit.

23.

Private citizens are no longer murdered, enslaved, or carried
off to distant parts, and the inoffensive individual is as little disturbed

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[474/0496] Anhang. his stock of provisions, it is lawful, though an extreme measure, to drive them back, so as to hasten on the surrender. 19. Commanders, whenever admissible, inform the enemy of their intention to bombard a place, so that the non-combatants, and espe- cially the women and children, may be removed before the bom- bardment commences. But it is no infraction of the common law of war to omit thus to inform the enemy. Surprise may be a necessity. 20. Public war is a state of armed hostility between sovereign nations or governments. It is a law and requisite of civilized exi- stence that men live in political, continuous societies, forming orga- nized units, called states or nations, whose constituents bear, enjoy, and suffer, advance and retrograde together, in peace and in war. 21. The citizen or native of a hostile country is thus an enemy, as one of the constituents of the hostile state or nation, and as such is subjected to the hardships of the war. 22. Nevertheless, as civilization has advanced during the last cen- turies, so has likewise steadily advanced, especially in war on land, the distinction between the private individual belonging to a hostile country and the hostile country itself, with its men in arms. The principle bas been more and more acknowledged that the unarmed citizen is to be spared in person, property, and honor as much as the exigencies of war will admit. 23. Private citizens are no longer murdered, enslaved, or carried off to distant parts, and the inoffensive individual is as little disturbed

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URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/496
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 474. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/496>, abgerufen am 19.03.2019.