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Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

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Amerikanische Kriegsartikel der Vereinigten Staten von 1863.
in his private relations as the commander of the hostile troops can
afford to grant in the overruling demands of a vigorous war.

24.

The almost universal rule in remote times was, and continues
to be with barbarous armies, that the private individual of the hostile
country is destined to suffer every privation of liberty and protection,
and every disruption of family ties. Protection was, and still is
with uncivilized people, the exception.

25.

In modern regular wars of the Europeans, and their descend-
ants in other portions of the globe, protection of the inoffensive
citizen of the hostile country is the rule; privation and disturbance
of private relations are the exceptions.

26.

Commanding generals may cause the magistrates and civil
officers of the hostile country to take the oath of temporary allegi-
ance or an oath of fidelity to their own victorious government or
rulers, and they may expel every one who declines to do so. But
whether they do so or not, the people and their civil officers owe
strict obedience to them as long as they hold sway over the district
or country, at the peril of their lives.

27.

The law of war can no more wholly dispense with retaliation
than can the law of nations, of which it is a branch. Yet civilized
nations acknowledge retaliation as the sternest feature of war. A
reckless enemy often leaves to his opponent no other means of se-
curing himself against the repetition of barbarous outrage.

28.

Retaliation will, therefore, never be resorted to as a measure
of mere revenge, but only as a means of protective retribution, and,

Amerikaniſche Kriegsartikel der Vereinigten Staten von 1863.
in his private relations as the commander of the hostile troops can
afford to grant in the overruling demands of a vigorous war.

24.

The almost universal rule in remote times was, and continues
to be with barbarous armies, that the private individual of the hostile
country is destined to suffer every privation of liberty and protection,
and every disruption of family ties. Protection was, and still is
with uncivilized people, the exception.

25.

In modern regular wars of the Europeans, and their descend-
ants in other portions of the globe, protection of the inoffensive
citizen of the hostile country is the rule; privation and disturbance
of private relations are the exceptions.

26.

Commanding generals may cause the magistrates and civil
officers of the hostile country to take the oath of temporary allegi-
ance or an oath of fidelity to their own victorious government or
rulers, and they may expel every one who declines to do so. But
whether they do so or not, the people and their civil officers owe
strict obedience to them as long as they hold sway over the district
or country, at the peril of their lives.

27.

The law of war can no more wholly dispense with retaliation
than can the law of nations, of which it is a branch. Yet civilized
nations acknowledge retaliation as the sternest feature of war. A
reckless enemy often leaves to his opponent no other means of se-
curing himself against the repetition of barbarous outrage.

28.

Retaliation will, therefore, never be resorted to as a measure
of mere revenge, but only as a means of protective retribution, and,

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[475/0497] Amerikaniſche Kriegsartikel der Vereinigten Staten von 1863. in his private relations as the commander of the hostile troops can afford to grant in the overruling demands of a vigorous war. 24. The almost universal rule in remote times was, and continues to be with barbarous armies, that the private individual of the hostile country is destined to suffer every privation of liberty and protection, and every disruption of family ties. Protection was, and still is with uncivilized people, the exception. 25. In modern regular wars of the Europeans, and their descend- ants in other portions of the globe, protection of the inoffensive citizen of the hostile country is the rule; privation and disturbance of private relations are the exceptions. 26. Commanding generals may cause the magistrates and civil officers of the hostile country to take the oath of temporary allegi- ance or an oath of fidelity to their own victorious government or rulers, and they may expel every one who declines to do so. But whether they do so or not, the people and their civil officers owe strict obedience to them as long as they hold sway over the district or country, at the peril of their lives. 27. The law of war can no more wholly dispense with retaliation than can the law of nations, of which it is a branch. Yet civilized nations acknowledge retaliation as the sternest feature of war. A reckless enemy often leaves to his opponent no other means of se- curing himself against the repetition of barbarous outrage. 28. Retaliation will, therefore, never be resorted to as a measure of mere revenge, but only as a means of protective retribution, and,

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URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/497
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 475. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/497>, abgerufen am 20.02.2019.