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Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

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Anhang.
instruments, such as astronomical telescopes, as well as hospitals,
must be secured against all avoidable injury, even when they are
contained in fortified places whilst besieged or bombarded.

36.

If such works of art, libraries, collections, or instruments belong-
ing to a hostile nation or government, can be removed without
injury, the ruler of the conquering state or nation may order them
to be seized and removed for the benefit of the said nation. The
ultimate owner-ship is to be settled by the ensuing treaty of peace.

In no case shall they be sold or given away, if captured by
the armies of the United States, nor shall they ever be privately
appropriated, or wantonly destroyed or injured.

37.

The United States acknowledge and protect, in hostile countries
occupied by them, religion and morality; strictly private property;
the persons of the inhabitants, especially those of women; and the
sacredness of domestic relations. Offences to the contrary shall be
rigorously punished.

This rule does not interfere with the right of the victorious
invader to tax the people or their property, to levy forced loans, to
billet soldiers, or to appropriate property, especially houses, land,
boats or ships, and churches, for temporary and military uses.

38.

Private property, unless forfeited by crimes or by offences of
the owner, can be seized only by way of military necessity, for the
support or other benefit of the army or of the United States.

If the owner has not fled, the commanding officer will cause
receipts to be given, which may serve the spoliated owner to obtain
indemnity.

39.

The salaries of civil officers of the hostile government who

Anhang.
instruments, such as astronomical telescopes, as well as hospitals,
must be secured against all avoidable injury, even when they are
contained in fortified places whilst besieged or bombarded.

36.

If such works of art, libraries, collections, or instruments belong-
ing to a hostile nation or government, can be removed without
injury, the ruler of the conquering state or nation may order them
to be seized and removed for the benefit of the said nation. The
ultimate owner-ship is to be settled by the ensuing treaty of peace.

In no case shall they be sold or given away, if captured by
the armies of the United States, nor shall they ever be privately
appropriated, or wantonly destroyed or injured.

37.

The United States acknowledge and protect, in hostile countries
occupied by them, religion and morality; strictly private property;
the persons of the inhabitants, especially those of women; and the
sacredness of domestic relations. Offences to the contrary shall be
rigorously punished.

This rule does not interfere with the right of the victorious
invader to tax the people or their property, to levy forced loans, to
billet soldiers, or to appropriate property, especially houses, land,
boats or ships, and churches, for temporary and military uses.

38.

Private property, unless forfeited by crimes or by offences of
the owner, can be seized only by way of military necessity, for the
support or other benefit of the army or of the United States.

If the owner has not fled, the commanding officer will cause
receipts to be given, which may serve the spoliated owner to obtain
indemnity.

39.

The salaries of civil officers of the hostile government who

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                  <fw place="top" type="header">Anhang.</fw><lb/> <hi rendition="#aq">instruments, such as astronomical telescopes, as well as hospitals,<lb/>
must be secured against all avoidable injury, even when they are<lb/>
contained in fortified places whilst besieged or bombarded.</hi> </p>
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                <head>36.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">If such works of art, libraries, collections, or instruments belong-<lb/>
ing to a hostile nation or government, can be removed without<lb/>
injury, the ruler of the conquering state or nation may order them<lb/>
to be seized and removed for the benefit of the said nation. The<lb/>
ultimate owner-ship is to be settled by the ensuing treaty of peace.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">In no case shall they be sold or given away, if captured by<lb/>
the armies of the United States, nor shall they ever be privately<lb/>
appropriated, or wantonly destroyed or injured.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>37.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">The United States acknowledge and protect, in hostile countries<lb/>
occupied by them, religion and morality; strictly private property;<lb/>
the persons of the inhabitants, especially those of women; and the<lb/>
sacredness of domestic relations. Offences to the contrary shall be<lb/>
rigorously punished.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">This rule does not interfere with the right of the victorious<lb/>
invader to tax the people or their property, to levy forced loans, to<lb/>
billet soldiers, or to appropriate property, especially houses, land,<lb/>
boats or ships, and churches, for temporary and military uses.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>38.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Private property, unless forfeited by crimes or by offences of<lb/>
the owner, can be seized only by way of military necessity, for the<lb/>
support or other benefit of the army or of the United States.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">If the owner has not fled, the commanding officer will cause<lb/>
receipts to be given, which may serve the spoliated owner to obtain<lb/>
indemnity.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>39.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">The salaries of civil officers of the hostile government who</hi><lb/>
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[478/0500] Anhang. instruments, such as astronomical telescopes, as well as hospitals, must be secured against all avoidable injury, even when they are contained in fortified places whilst besieged or bombarded. 36. If such works of art, libraries, collections, or instruments belong- ing to a hostile nation or government, can be removed without injury, the ruler of the conquering state or nation may order them to be seized and removed for the benefit of the said nation. The ultimate owner-ship is to be settled by the ensuing treaty of peace. In no case shall they be sold or given away, if captured by the armies of the United States, nor shall they ever be privately appropriated, or wantonly destroyed or injured. 37. The United States acknowledge and protect, in hostile countries occupied by them, religion and morality; strictly private property; the persons of the inhabitants, especially those of women; and the sacredness of domestic relations. Offences to the contrary shall be rigorously punished. This rule does not interfere with the right of the victorious invader to tax the people or their property, to levy forced loans, to billet soldiers, or to appropriate property, especially houses, land, boats or ships, and churches, for temporary and military uses. 38. Private property, unless forfeited by crimes or by offences of the owner, can be seized only by way of military necessity, for the support or other benefit of the army or of the United States. If the owner has not fled, the commanding officer will cause receipts to be given, which may serve the spoliated owner to obtain indemnity. 39. The salaries of civil officers of the hostile government who

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URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/500
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 478. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/500>, abgerufen am 17.02.2019.