Anmelden (DTAQ) DWDS     dlexDB     CLARIN-D

Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

Bild:
<< vorherige Seite
Anhang.
50.

Moreover, citizens who accompany an army for whatever pur-
pose, such as sutlers, editors, or reporters of journals, or contractors,
if captured, may be made prisoners of war, and be detained as such.

The monarch and members of the hostile reigning family,
male or female, the chief, and chief officers of the hostile govern-
ment, its diplomatic agents, and all persons who are of particular
and singular use and benefit to the hostile army or its government,
are, if captured on belligerent ground, and if unprovided with a
safe-conduct granted by the captor's government, prisoners of war.

51.

If the people of that portion of an invaded country which
is not yet occupied by the enemy, or of the whole country, at the
approach of a hostile army, rise, under a duly authorized levy, en
masse
to resist the invader, they are now treated as public enemies,
and if captured, are prisoners of war.

52.

No belligerent has the right to declare that he will treat every
captured man in arms of a levy en masse as a brigand or bandit.

If, however, the people of a country, or any portion of the
same, already occupied by an army, rise against it, they are vio-
laters of the laws of war, and are not entitled to their protection.

53.

The enemy's chaplains, officers of the medical staff, apotheca-
ries, hospital nurses and servants, if they fall into the hands of the
American army, are not prisoners of war, unless the commander has
reasons to retain them. In this latter case, or if, at their own
desire, they are allowed to remain with their captured companions,
they are treated as prisoners of war, and may be exchanged if the
commander sees fit.

Anhang.
50.

Moreover, citizens who accompany an army for whatever pur-
pose, such as sutlers, editors, or reporters of journals, or contractors,
if captured, may be made prisoners of war, and be detained as such.

The monarch and members of the hostile reigning family,
male or female, the chief, and chief officers of the hostile govern-
ment, its diplomatic agents, and all persons who are of particular
and singular use and benefit to the hostile army or its government,
are, if captured on belligerent ground, and if unprovided with a
safe-conduct granted by the captor’s government, prisoners of war.

51.

If the people of that portion of an invaded country which
is not yet occupied by the enemy, or of the whole country, at the
approach of a hostile army, rise, under a duly authorized levy, en
masse
to resist the invader, they are now treated as public enemies,
and if captured, are prisoners of war.

52.

No belligerent has the right to declare that he will treat every
captured man in arms of a levy en masse as a brigand or bandit.

If, however, the people of a country, or any portion of the
same, already occupied by an army, rise against it, they are vio-
laters of the laws of war, and are not entitled to their protection.

53.

The enemy’s chaplains, officers of the medical staff, apotheca-
ries, hospital nurses and servants, if they fall into the hands of the
American army, are not prisoners of war, unless the commander has
reasons to retain them. In this latter case, or if, at their own
desire, they are allowed to remain with their captured companions,
they are treated as prisoners of war, and may be exchanged if the
commander sees fit.

<TEI>
  <text>
    <body>
      <div n="1">
        <div n="2">
          <div n="3">
            <div n="4">
              <pb facs="#f0504" n="482"/>
              <fw place="top" type="header">Anhang.</fw><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>50.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Moreover, citizens who accompany an army for whatever pur-<lb/>
pose, such as sutlers, editors, or reporters of journals, or contractors,<lb/>
if captured, may be made prisoners of war, and be detained as such.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">The monarch and members of the hostile reigning family,<lb/>
male or female, the chief, and chief officers of the hostile govern-<lb/>
ment, its diplomatic agents, and all persons who are of particular<lb/>
and singular use and benefit to the hostile army or its government,<lb/>
are, if captured on belligerent ground, and if unprovided with a<lb/>
safe-conduct granted by the captor&#x2019;s government, prisoners of war.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>51.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">If the people of that portion of an invaded country which<lb/>
is not yet occupied by the enemy, or of the whole country, at the<lb/>
approach of a hostile army, rise, under a duly authorized levy, <hi rendition="#i">en<lb/>
masse</hi> to resist the invader, they are now treated as public enemies,<lb/>
and if captured, are prisoners of war.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>52.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">No belligerent has the right to declare that he will treat every<lb/>
captured man in arms of a levy <hi rendition="#i">en masse</hi> as a brigand or bandit.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">If, however, the people of a country, or any portion of the<lb/>
same, already occupied by an army, rise against it, they are vio-<lb/>
laters of the laws of war, and are not entitled to their protection.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
              <div n="5">
                <head>53.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">The enemy&#x2019;s chaplains, officers of the medical staff, apotheca-<lb/>
ries, hospital nurses and servants, if they fall into the hands of the<lb/>
American army, are not prisoners of war, unless the commander has<lb/>
reasons to retain them. In this latter case, or if, at their own<lb/>
desire, they are allowed to remain with their captured companions,<lb/>
they are treated as prisoners of war, and may be exchanged if the<lb/>
commander sees fit.</hi> </p>
              </div><lb/>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>
[482/0504] Anhang. 50. Moreover, citizens who accompany an army for whatever pur- pose, such as sutlers, editors, or reporters of journals, or contractors, if captured, may be made prisoners of war, and be detained as such. The monarch and members of the hostile reigning family, male or female, the chief, and chief officers of the hostile govern- ment, its diplomatic agents, and all persons who are of particular and singular use and benefit to the hostile army or its government, are, if captured on belligerent ground, and if unprovided with a safe-conduct granted by the captor’s government, prisoners of war. 51. If the people of that portion of an invaded country which is not yet occupied by the enemy, or of the whole country, at the approach of a hostile army, rise, under a duly authorized levy, en masse to resist the invader, they are now treated as public enemies, and if captured, are prisoners of war. 52. No belligerent has the right to declare that he will treat every captured man in arms of a levy en masse as a brigand or bandit. If, however, the people of a country, or any portion of the same, already occupied by an army, rise against it, they are vio- laters of the laws of war, and are not entitled to their protection. 53. The enemy’s chaplains, officers of the medical staff, apotheca- ries, hospital nurses and servants, if they fall into the hands of the American army, are not prisoners of war, unless the commander has reasons to retain them. In this latter case, or if, at their own desire, they are allowed to remain with their captured companions, they are treated as prisoners of war, and may be exchanged if the commander sees fit.

Suche im Werk

Hilfe

Informationen zum Werk

Download dieses Werks

XML (TEI P5) · HTML · Text
TCF (text annotation layer)
TCF (tokenisiert, serialisiert, lemmatisiert, normalisiert)
XML (TEI P5 inkl. att.linguistic)

Metadaten zum Werk

TEI-Header · CMDI · Dublin Core

Ansichten dieser Seite

Voyant Tools ?

Feedback

Sie haben einen Fehler gefunden? Dann können Sie diesen über unsere Qualitätssicherungsplattform DTAQ melden.

Kommentar zur DTA-Ausgabe

Dieses Werk wurde gemäß den DTA-Transkriptionsrichtlinien im Double-Keying-Verfahren von Muttersprachlern erfasst und in XML/TEI P5 nach DTA-Basisformat kodiert.




Ansicht auf Standard zurückstellen

URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/504
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 482. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/504>, abgerufen am 19.03.2019.