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Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

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Anhang.
moreover, cautiously and unavoidably; that is to say, retaliation shall
only be resorted to after careful inquiry into the real occurrence,
and the character of the misdeeds that may demand retribution.

Unjust or inconsiderate retaliation removes the belligerents
farther and farther from the mitigating rules of a regular war, and
by rapid steps leads them nearer to the internecine wars of savages.

29.

Modern times are distinguished from earlier ages by the exi-
stence, at one and the same time, of many nations and great govern-
ments related to one another in close intercourse.

Peace is their normal condition; war is the exception. The
ultimate object of all modern war is a renewed state of peace.

The more vigorously wars are pursued, the better it is for
humanity. Sharp wars are brief.

30.

Ever since the formation and coexistence of modern nations,
and ever since wars have become great national wars, war has come
to be acknowledged not to be its own end, but the means to obtain
great ends of state, or to consist in defence against wrong; and no
conventional restriction of the modes adopted to injure the enemy
is any longer admitted; but the law of war imposes many limitations
and restrictions on principles of justice, faith, and honor.

Section II.

Public and private property of the enemy -- Protection of persons, and
especially women; of religion, the arts and sciences -- Punishment of
crimes against the inhabitants of hostile countries.

31.

A victorious army appropriates all public money, seizes all
public movable property until further direction by its government,

Anhang.
moreover, cautiously and unavoidably; that is to say, retaliation shall
only be resorted to after careful inquiry into the real occurrence,
and the character of the misdeeds that may demand retribution.

Unjust or inconsiderate retaliation removes the belligerents
farther and farther from the mitigating rules of a regular war, and
by rapid steps leads them nearer to the internecine wars of savages.

29.

Modern times are distinguished from earlier ages by the exi-
stence, at one and the same time, of many nations and great govern-
ments related to one another in close intercourse.

Peace is their normal condition; war is the exception. The
ultimate object of all modern war is a renewed state of peace.

The more vigorously wars are pursued, the better it is for
humanity. Sharp wars are brief.

30.

Ever since the formation and coexistence of modern nations,
and ever since wars have become great national wars, war has come
to be acknowledged not to be its own end, but the means to obtain
great ends of state, or to consist in defence against wrong; and no
conventional restriction of the modes adopted to injure the enemy
is any longer admitted; but the law of war imposes many limitations
and restrictions on principles of justice, faith, and honor.

Section II.

Public and private property of the enemy — Protection of persons, and
especially women; of religion, the arts and sciences — Punishment of
crimes against the inhabitants of hostile countries.

31.

A victorious army appropriates all public money, seizes all
public movable property until further direction by its government,

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                  <fw place="top" type="header">Anhang.</fw><lb/> <hi rendition="#aq">moreover, cautiously and unavoidably; that is to say, retaliation shall<lb/>
only be resorted to after careful inquiry into the real occurrence,<lb/>
and the character of the misdeeds that may demand retribution.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Unjust or inconsiderate retaliation removes the belligerents<lb/>
farther and farther from the mitigating rules of a regular war, and<lb/>
by rapid steps leads them nearer to the internecine wars of savages.</hi> </p>
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                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Modern times are distinguished from earlier ages by the exi-<lb/>
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ments related to one another in close intercourse.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Peace is their normal condition; war is the exception. The<lb/>
ultimate object of all modern war is a renewed state of peace.</hi> </p><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">The more vigorously wars are pursued, the better it is for<lb/>
humanity. Sharp wars are brief.</hi> </p>
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                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Ever since the formation and coexistence of modern nations,<lb/>
and ever since wars have become great national wars, war has come<lb/>
to be acknowledged not to be its own end, but the means to obtain<lb/>
great ends of state, or to consist in defence against wrong; and no<lb/>
conventional restriction of the modes adopted to injure the enemy<lb/>
is any longer admitted; but the law of war imposes many limitations<lb/>
and restrictions on principles of justice, faith, and honor.</hi> </p>
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                <head>31.</head><lb/>
                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">A victorious army appropriates all public money, seizes all<lb/>
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[476/0498] Anhang. moreover, cautiously and unavoidably; that is to say, retaliation shall only be resorted to after careful inquiry into the real occurrence, and the character of the misdeeds that may demand retribution. Unjust or inconsiderate retaliation removes the belligerents farther and farther from the mitigating rules of a regular war, and by rapid steps leads them nearer to the internecine wars of savages. 29. Modern times are distinguished from earlier ages by the exi- stence, at one and the same time, of many nations and great govern- ments related to one another in close intercourse. Peace is their normal condition; war is the exception. The ultimate object of all modern war is a renewed state of peace. The more vigorously wars are pursued, the better it is for humanity. Sharp wars are brief. 30. Ever since the formation and coexistence of modern nations, and ever since wars have become great national wars, war has come to be acknowledged not to be its own end, but the means to obtain great ends of state, or to consist in defence against wrong; and no conventional restriction of the modes adopted to injure the enemy is any longer admitted; but the law of war imposes many limitations and restrictions on principles of justice, faith, and honor. Section II. Public and private property of the enemy — Protection of persons, and especially women; of religion, the arts and sciences — Punishment of crimes against the inhabitants of hostile countries. 31. A victorious army appropriates all public money, seizes all public movable property until further direction by its government,

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URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/498
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 476. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/498>, abgerufen am 17.02.2019.