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Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

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Anhang.
71.

Whoever intentionally inflicts additional wounds on an enemy
already wholly disabled, or kills such an enemy, or who orders or
encourages soldiers to do so, shall suffer death, if duly convicted,
whether he belongs to the army of the United States, or is an enemy
captured after having committed his misdeed.

72.

Money and other valuables on the person of a prisoner, such
as watches or jewelry, as well as extra clothing, are regarded by
the American army as the private property of the prisoner, and the
appropriation of such valuables or money is considered dishonorable,
and is prohibited.

Nevertheless, if large sums are found upon the persons of pri-
soners, or in their possession, they shall be taken from them, and
the surplus, after providing for their own support, appropriated for
the use of the army, under the direction of the commander, unless
otherwise ordered by the government. Nor can prisoners claim,
as private property, large sums found and captured in their train,
although they had been placed in the private luggage of the
prisoners.

73.

All officers, when captured, must surrender their side-arms to
the captor. They may be restored to the prisoner in marked cases,
by the commander, to signalize admiration of his distinguished bra-
very, or approbation of his humane treatment of prisoners before
his capture. The captured officer to whom they may be restored
cannot wear them during captivity.

74.

A prisoner of war, being a public enemy, is the prisoner of
the government, and not of the captor. No ransom can be paid by
a prisoner of war to his individual captor, or to any officer in

Anhang.
71.

Whoever intentionally inflicts additional wounds on an enemy
already wholly disabled, or kills such an enemy, or who orders or
encourages soldiers to do so, shall suffer death, if duly convicted,
whether he belongs to the army of the United States, or is an enemy
captured after having committed his misdeed.

72.

Money and other valuables on the person of a prisoner, such
as watches or jewelry, as well as extra clothing, are regarded by
the American army as the private property of the prisoner, and the
appropriation of such valuables or money is considered dishonorable,
and is prohibited.

Nevertheless, if large sums are found upon the persons of pri-
soners, or in their possession, they shall be taken from them, and
the surplus, after providing for their own support, appropriated for
the use of the army, under the direction of the commander, unless
otherwise ordered by the government. Nor can prisoners claim,
as private property, large sums found and captured in their train,
although they had been placed in the private luggage of the
prisoners.

73.

All officers, when captured, must surrender their side-arms to
the captor. They may be restored to the prisoner in marked cases,
by the commander, to signalize admiration of his distinguished bra-
very, or approbation of his humane treatment of prisoners before
his capture. The captured officer to whom they may be restored
cannot wear them during captivity.

74.

A prisoner of war, being a public enemy, is the prisoner of
the government, and not of the captor. No ransom can be paid by
a prisoner of war to his individual captor, or to any officer in

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                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Whoever intentionally inflicts additional wounds on an enemy<lb/>
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[486/0508] Anhang. 71. Whoever intentionally inflicts additional wounds on an enemy already wholly disabled, or kills such an enemy, or who orders or encourages soldiers to do so, shall suffer death, if duly convicted, whether he belongs to the army of the United States, or is an enemy captured after having committed his misdeed. 72. Money and other valuables on the person of a prisoner, such as watches or jewelry, as well as extra clothing, are regarded by the American army as the private property of the prisoner, and the appropriation of such valuables or money is considered dishonorable, and is prohibited. Nevertheless, if large sums are found upon the persons of pri- soners, or in their possession, they shall be taken from them, and the surplus, after providing for their own support, appropriated for the use of the army, under the direction of the commander, unless otherwise ordered by the government. Nor can prisoners claim, as private property, large sums found and captured in their train, although they had been placed in the private luggage of the prisoners. 73. All officers, when captured, must surrender their side-arms to the captor. They may be restored to the prisoner in marked cases, by the commander, to signalize admiration of his distinguished bra- very, or approbation of his humane treatment of prisoners before his capture. The captured officer to whom they may be restored cannot wear them during captivity. 74. A prisoner of war, being a public enemy, is the prisoner of the government, and not of the captor. No ransom can be paid by a prisoner of war to his individual captor, or to any officer in

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URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/508
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 486. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/508>, abgerufen am 20.03.2019.