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Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868.

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Anhang.
97.

Guides, when it is clearly proved that they have misled inten-
tionally, may be put to death.

98.

All unauthorized or secret communication with the enemy is
considered treasonable by the law of war.

Foreign residents in an invaded or occupied territory, or foreign
visitors in the same, can claim no immunity from this law. They
may communicate with foreign parts, or with the inhabitants of the
hostile country, so far as the military authority permits, but no
further. Instant expulsion from the occupied territory would be the
very least punishment for the infraction of this rule.

99.

A messenger carrying written despatches or verbal messages
from one portion of the army, or from a besieged place, to another
portion of the same army, or its government, if armed, and in the
uniform of his army, and if captured while doing so, in the territory
occupied by the enemy, is treated by the captor as a prisoner of
war. If not in uniform, nor a soldier, the circumstances connected
with his capture must determine the disposition that shall be made
of him.

100.

A messenger or agent who attempts to steal trough the terri-
tory occupied by the enemy, to further, in any manner, the interests
of the enemy, if captured, is not entitled to the privileges of the
prisoner of war, and may be dealt with according to the circum-
stances of the case.

101.

While deception in war is admited as a just and necessary
means of hostility, and is consistent with honorable warfare, the

Anhang.
97.

Guides, when it is clearly proved that they have misled inten-
tionally, may be put to death.

98.

All unauthorized or secret communication with the enemy is
considered treasonable by the law of war.

Foreign residents in an invaded or occupied territory, or foreign
visitors in the same, can claim no immunity from this law. They
may communicate with foreign parts, or with the inhabitants of the
hostile country, so far as the military authority permits, but no
further. Instant expulsion from the occupied territory would be the
very least punishment for the infraction of this rule.

99.

A messenger carrying written despatches or verbal messages
from one portion of the army, or from a besieged place, to another
portion of the same army, or its government, if armed, and in the
uniform of his army, and if captured while doing so, in the territory
occupied by the enemy, is treated by the captor as a prisoner of
war. If not in uniform, nor a soldier, the circumstances connected
with his capture must determine the disposition that shall be made
of him.

100.

A messenger or agent who attempts to steal trough the terri-
tory occupied by the enemy, to further, in any manner, the interests
of the enemy, if captured, is not entitled to the privileges of the
prisoner of war, and may be dealt with according to the circum-
stances of the case.

101.

While deception in war is admited as a just and necessary
means of hostility, and is consistent with honorable warfare, the

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                <p> <hi rendition="#aq">Foreign residents in an invaded or occupied territory, or foreign<lb/>
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portion of the same army, or its government, if armed, and in the<lb/>
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[492/0514] Anhang. 97. Guides, when it is clearly proved that they have misled inten- tionally, may be put to death. 98. All unauthorized or secret communication with the enemy is considered treasonable by the law of war. Foreign residents in an invaded or occupied territory, or foreign visitors in the same, can claim no immunity from this law. They may communicate with foreign parts, or with the inhabitants of the hostile country, so far as the military authority permits, but no further. Instant expulsion from the occupied territory would be the very least punishment for the infraction of this rule. 99. A messenger carrying written despatches or verbal messages from one portion of the army, or from a besieged place, to another portion of the same army, or its government, if armed, and in the uniform of his army, and if captured while doing so, in the territory occupied by the enemy, is treated by the captor as a prisoner of war. If not in uniform, nor a soldier, the circumstances connected with his capture must determine the disposition that shall be made of him. 100. A messenger or agent who attempts to steal trough the terri- tory occupied by the enemy, to further, in any manner, the interests of the enemy, if captured, is not entitled to the privileges of the prisoner of war, and may be dealt with according to the circum- stances of the case. 101. While deception in war is admited as a just and necessary means of hostility, and is consistent with honorable warfare, the

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URL zu diesem Werk: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868
URL zu dieser Seite: http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/514
Zitationshilfe: Bluntschli, Johann Caspar: Das moderne Völkerrecht der civilisirten Staten. Nördlingen, 1868, S. 492. In: Deutsches Textarchiv <http://www.deutschestextarchiv.de/bluntschli_voelkerrecht_1868/514>, abgerufen am 18.02.2019.